What I’m really thinking: the mobile phone refusenik – The Guardian

I am part of the tiny minority of people in the UK who choose to live without a mobile phone. You probably think I must be old, anti-technology or just plain weird, but I am none of those things.

I’m in my 30s, use a computer (desktop) and don’t consider myself odd. I simply don’t see the appeal or advantages of a mobile phone. I had one once, 19 years ago, which came free with a bank account. I never used it and I’ve never felt the need to use one since. My husband doesn’t have one, either.

You say you need to be available at all times, yet when I try to call you, your phone is switched off. You say, how can you meet people? I say, what happened to agreeing on a time and place, and just being there? You say you can’t contact me, but I’ve got a landline and I know how to use email. Surely not everything has to happen on WhatsApp, Snapchat or Facebook?

All I see are people not interacting with each other, not noticing the world around them, becoming more and more stressed because they need to answer their work emails or answer their phones, because someone at the other end is expecting them to. Can nobody wait any more?

The sad reality is that everyone is becoming more disconnected – the opposite of what people claim mobile phones are supposed to do. And I’m sorry if it’s so much hassle to contact me, but I don’t want to be part of a world in which you stay connected only through technology.

• Tell us what you’re really thinking – email mind@theguardian.com

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